Why a vaccine for CORONAVIRUS could take much longer than a year

Why a vaccine for CORONAVIRUS could take much longer than a year

Plus: Some good news from America’s first hot spot, what it looks like when the world goes quiet, and more  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌    ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  
 
WHEN THE WORLD GOES QUIET VIEW ONLINE
National Geographic
The Coronavirus Pandemic
To help you and your families better understand COVID-19—and learn how to protect yourselves—National Geographic is providing free access to all of our coronavirus coverage. To support more content like this, please consider subscribing to National Geographic.
PHOTOGRAPH BY TED S. WARREN, AP PHOTO
Is America’s first hot spot flattening the curve?
As the rest of the nation grapples with a rising death toll and the surging spread of coronavirus, early actions appear to be working in Washington state. But officials here are emphatic: The danger hasn’t passed.
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PHOTOGRAPH BY THIBAULT SAVARY, AFP VIA GETTY IMAGES
Developing a vaccine in one year would be ‘unprecedented’
The mumps vaccine—considered the fastest ever approved—took four years to go from collecting viral samples to licensing a drug in 1967.
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RYAN MORRIS, NGM STAFF
Pollution made COVID-19 worse. Now, lockdowns are clearing the air.
Even before the coronavirus, air pollution killed seven million people a year. Will today’s cleaner air inspire us to do better?
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Other coverage
Is it safe to eat takeout? (NPR)  ››
How NOT to wear a mask (NYT)  ››
TAYLOR MAGGIACOMO AND MAYA WEI-HAAS, NG STAFF
These charts show how coronavirus has ‘quieted’ the world
As people stopped commuting and traveling, the Earth’s surface vibrated less—and seismologists tracked the change.
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PHOTOGRAPH BY VINCENT J. MUSI, NAT GEO IMAGE COLLECTION
The hunt for the next potential coronavirus animal host
Some scientists warn there’s a small but real possibility the virus could take refuge in a new animal host and reintroduce it to humans in the future.
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